William Bourn  ‎(I327)‎
Given Names: William
Surname: Bourn

Gender: MaleMale
      

Birth: about 1743 35 7 Culpepper County, Virginia
Death: 7 September 1818 ‎(Age 75)‎ Franklin county, Kentucky
Personal Facts and Details
Notes

Note
“In The Hollow Of His Hand”
By Mrs. W. Leslie Collins

"About one hundred and eighteen years ago there lived in Franklin County, Ky., a well-to-do farmer named Bourne. His farm extended into the present adjoining county of Anderson, which then formed a part a part of Woodford County.

At that time civilization had not driven out all of the primitive denizens of the forests and wolves, catamounts and panthers added the terrors of their presence to the terrors of the wood and occasionally, impelled by hunger, they approached thesc attered habitations of men to seize upon, and devour, all unprotected live stock---even if it was in the doorway of its sturdy owner who dared not venture out alone to the rescue; and the watch dogs would bark vociferously at a safe distance from t he fierce marauder, or would fly with drooping tails and frightened yelps to a convenient hiding place.

Many a belated hunter has quickened his footsteps as he felt his long hair rise from his neck on hearing the awful screams of a panther pierce the darkness, or the far-off howls of wolves that were perhaps on his trail. Often the soft patter of ste althy foot-falls greeted his ears. And often gleaming eyes stared at him from leafy hiding places. Often he was called upon to combat the owner of the fiery eyes, and not always was the hunter the victor; but Farmer Bourne never suffered worsethana semi-occasional nocturnal visit from a hungry catamount to his pig or hen roost.

Mr. Bourne and his excellent wife, with their large family of bright young children and well satisfied negroes, lived an industrious and happy life. But one day there happened an event that threatened to cloud their lives with sorrow. Their beautif ul little daughter, Mary Ann, then six years of age, was the very light of their eyes.

One afternoon Mr. Bourne sent one of his colored men into the adjacent wood to fell trees, and, after awhile, unknown to anyone, little Mary Ann tied her little sunbonnet over her fair curls, and accompanied by her pet lamb, followed the man into t he wood “to gather flowers” as she afterward said, and fully expecting to find the colored man and return home with him; but she did not find him, and, in her search, wandered farther and farther into the forest until she became hopelessly lost .

The shades of eve were falling when Mrs. Bourne missed her little daughter and alarmed the household. Every nook and corner of the home place underwent an unsuccessful search; then the neighborhood was aroused, and the half frantic mother gatheredh er remaining children about her and wept and prayed the long night through, while men and boys, with torches and dogs, scoured the surrounding forest. They found a few bunches of withered wild flowers, and a tuft of soft white wool on a thorn bush, but it was dawn before they found the little child who was half sitting, half reclining against a tree, miles from home, sound asleep with her little sun bonnet drawn over her tear-stained face, and the bloody head of her pet lamb clasped tightlyin her chubby arms.

The overjoyed father clasped his child to his breast, and strong men wept tears of horror and sympathy when the child told the story of the bloody lamb’s head, and the awful danger of which she was entirely ignorant. She told of how she was metin the darkness—which was dimly illumined by the straggling light of the moon—by several “funny looking dogs” who sprang upon her poor little lamb and almost tore it to pieces before her eyes. Then a “big cat” came and drove the “dogs” away. In the struggle the lamb’s head was torn entirely off, and “the big cat” disappeared with the gory, headless body. Then the weeping child took the bloody head of her unfortunate pet, and wandered on and on until weariness overcame heran d she sank to rest in the place where she was found.

Amid the weird night sounds of the untracked forest, with the hooting of the owl in the tree above for a lullaby, the poor, tired child soon fell asleep to awaken in the strong arms of her devoted father.

Investigation proved the “funny looking dogs” to have been wolves, and the “big cat” an American panther of the largest kind.

Thus did God hold the child in the “hollow of his hand” and no evil touched her.

There are many persons now living in Franklin and Anderson counties, Kentucky, whose immediate ancestors joined in that memorable search.

Mary Ann Bourne lived to tell her children and grandchildren about the perils of that night. She was a remarkable woman and about forty-eight years ago, met a remarkable death—poisoned by eating a catalpa blossom. She left many descendants one of whom—a grandson—was the husband of the present writer."







Note
Research Note:
A few lines of possible importance to this genealogy,

Excerpt from, "History of Jessamine County, Kentucky from it's Earliest Settlement to 1898" by Bennett H. Young

...concerning the old settlers along Jessamine creek and their occupations. Beginning on the west side of Hickman road, running down Jessamine Creek,... ...RICHARD WEST was a gunsmith and farmer, and owned the farm where WM. BOURNE is now living;. ..





Note
Research Note

"The William Bourne Fam data from Mrs. Anna Maxwell, Vandalia Mo. researched by Frances Bednar of Dallas Tex does not always agree with data of Richard Darden Bourne" -“Marchant & related families of Georgia” by Mary Beth Marchant


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Family with Parents
Father
John Bourn ‎(I509)‎
Birth September 1707 33 On the south side of the Rappahannock River near Snow Creek, six miles from the town of Fredericksburg, St. Mary's Parish, Essex County ‎(in 1720 became Spotsylvania County)‎, Virginia
Death March 1774 ‎(Age 66)‎ Culpeper County, Virginia
28 years
Mother
 
Eleanor Davis ‎(I510)‎
Birth about 1736 Possibly Virginia
Death about 1812 ‎(Age 76)‎

Marriage: about 1736
2 years
#1
Brother
John Bourn ‎(I557)‎
Birth about 1738 30 2 Possibly, Culpeper County, Virginia
Death after 1817 ‎(Age 79)‎ Virginia
5 years
#2
William Bourn ‎(I327)‎
Birth about 1743 35 7 Culpepper County, Virginia
Death 7 September 1818 ‎(Age 75)‎ Franklin county, Kentucky
4 years
#3
Brother
Andrew Bourn ‎(I559)‎
Birth about 1747 39 11 Possibly, Culpeper County, Virginia
Death about 1815 ‎(Age 68)‎ Jesamine County, Kentucky
4 years
#4
Sister (Birth)
Jane Bourn ‎(I561)‎
Birth about 1750/51 (1751) 43 15 Probably, Culpeper County, Virginia
Death about 1845 ‎(Age 93)‎ Woodford County, Kentucky
4 years
#5
Sister
Mary Bourn ‎(I563)‎
Birth about 1755 47 19 Probably Culpeper County, Virginia
Death Yes
8 years
#6
Sister
Catherine Bourn ‎(I564)‎
Birth about 1763 55 27 Culpeper County, Virginia
Death Yes
2 years
#7
Sister (Birth)
Eleanor Bourn ‎(I569)‎
Birth about 1765 57 29 Culpeper County, Virginia
Death Yes
#8
Sister
Hannah Bourn ‎(I568)‎
Birth Probably Culpeper County, Virginia
Death Yes
#9
Sister
Susannah Bourn ‎(I567)‎
Birth Probably Culpeper County, Virginia
Death Yes
#10
Brother
Joseph Bourn ‎(I566)‎
Birth Probably Culpeper County, Virginia
Death Yes
#11
Sister
Elizabeth Bourn ‎(I565)‎
Birth Probably Culpeper County, Virginia
Death Yes
Father's Family with Sarah Ramsay
Father
John Bourn ‎(I509)‎
Birth September 1707 33 On the south side of the Rappahannock River near Snow Creek, six miles from the town of Fredericksburg, St. Mary's Parish, Essex County ‎(in 1720 became Spotsylvania County)‎, Virginia
Death March 1774 ‎(Age 66)‎ Culpeper County, Virginia
Step-Mother
Sarah Ramsay ‎(I545)‎
Birth Yes
Death Yes

Marriage: about 1726
#1
Half-Sister
Sarah Bourn ‎(I546)‎
Birth about 1726 18 Probably On the south side of the Rappahannock River near Snow Creek, six miles from the town of Fredericksburg, St. Mary's Parish, Essex County, Virginia
Death Yes
20 months
#2
Half-Brother (Birth)
Francis Bourn ‎(I550)‎
Birth 12 September 1727 20 Probably On the south side of the Rappahannock River near Snow Creek, six miles from the town of Fredericksburg, St. Mary's Parish, Essex County, Virginia
Death before September 1803 ‎(Age 75)‎ Probably Jessamine County, Kentucky
2 years
#3
Half-Brother (Birth)
William Bourn ‎(I553)‎
Birth about 1730 22 Probably, On the south side of the Rappahannock River near Snow Creek, six miles from the town of Fredericksburg, St. Mary's Parish, Essex County, Virginia
Death
Family with Ann West
William Bourn ‎(I327)‎
Birth about 1743 35 7 Culpepper County, Virginia
Death 7 September 1818 ‎(Age 75)‎ Franklin county, Kentucky
26 years
Wife
 
Ann West ‎(I328)‎
Birth 26 January 1769 61 39 Virginia
Death before 1792 ‎(Age 22)‎

Marriage: about 1784
16 months
#1
Son
Richard West Bourn ‎(I232)‎
Birth 4 May 1785 42 16 , , Virginia, U.S.A.
Death 12 March 1829 ‎(Age 43)‎ Kentucky
Family with Susannah DeJarnett
William Bourn ‎(I327)‎
Birth about 1743 35 7 Culpepper County, Virginia
Death 7 September 1818 ‎(Age 75)‎ Franklin county, Kentucky
Wife
Susannah DeJarnett ‎(I351)‎
Birth Yes
Death 19 June 1832 Franklin County, Kentucky

Marriage:   -- Caroline County, Virginia
#1
Daughter (Birth)
Mary Ann Bourn ‎(I352)‎
Birth 11 March 1796 53 Virginia
Death 7 June 1861 ‎(Age 65)‎
2 years
#2
Daughter (Birth)
Aphia "Affie" Bourn ‎(I353)‎
Birth 1798 55 Virginia
Death 6 August
Family with ‎(unknown)‎ Gray
William Bourn ‎(I327)‎
Birth about 1743 35 7 Culpepper County, Virginia
Death 7 September 1818 ‎(Age 75)‎ Franklin county, Kentucky
Wife



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